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Message of Ricardo Alarcón to the 'Millions More March'

Washington D.C., 15 October 2005

Under a bright autumn sky, thousands of African-American men, women and children converged on the nation's capital to mark the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March and demanded action to overcome poverty, injustice, joblessness and the effects of substandard schools in black communities.

Speakers included civil rights leaders, Hispanics, poor people, politicians, clergymen, professors, hip-hop musicians and American Indians. Among them were civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, former presidential candidate Al Sharpton and hip-hop executive Russell Simmons.

The crowd also watched video presentations by Ricardo Alarcón, president of the Cuban National Assembly, and Prime Minister P. J. Patterson of Jamaica.

Working Group Against Terrorism

Dear Friends. Ten years ago, Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam and you made history: for the first time at every corner of the world, millions of people discovered the true voice and real spirit of the millions of brothers and sisters that we discovered were there in your country.

This year you are celebrating, commemorating the tenth anniversary of the historic march.

Let me join you in that celebration and first of all to congratulate Minister Farrakhan, all organizers and all of you. This year, the US also made history in a very different manner. For many of us, many people around the world, we suddenly discovered that in the country that is supposed to be the richest one, the most powerful one, there is also a lot of misery and suffering, and we were sadden with all of you, when we learned about the terrible consequences that hurricane Katrina infringed over the people in the Gulf area.

Katrina was still punishing New Orleans, when we at the National Assembly of Cuba expressed our deep condolences to the people of the US, and the Cuban government offered to send the necessary help, that we thought was important at that moment: more than 1500 doctors, the majority of them women, with the experience in having dealt before with natural disasters, with their equipments, the proper medicines and so, were ready to go there to help those in need. Unfortunately, we never got an answer. But, that had some positive aspects. Starting for that initiative, we have created what we call the International Brigade that is named after Henry Reeve, a young American who fought and died here in Cuba fighting with us for the independence of Cuba in the 19th Century.

Those doctors are prepared to assist anybody in need in any part of the world, with their experience that they learned in the Caribbean, in Africa, serving in other countries. Hundreds of them are right now helping the people in Guatemala, Central America, victims of the terrible floods that took place recently there, and others may be helping very soon the Pakistanis, that were victims of the terrible earthquake  recently.

I would like to take this opportunity to salute all of you, to convey to you our deepest feelings of brotherhood and sympathy. We are brothers and sisters, we are neighbors who should be working together for a better world.

The very important issue facing our two peoples is to learn the truth, to be able to communicate with each other. At this moment the world is facing a very difficult circumstance: those who pretend to continue perpetuating a system of exploitation and discrimination do not want us to learn the truth: the truth is that people are dying right now, are suffering right now out of a war without justification, based on the excuse of fighting terrorism, and at the same time in your own country there are five brothers of mine, five Cubans who are examples of solidarity and international feelings. They also fought for the African peoples, they fought in Angola against apartheid and they were in the US fighting the terrorist groups that operate from there against my country.

That was expressed openly by the US Government in the indictment that they presented against them, and also in the convictions and the sentences that were imposed upon them. They were acquitted on August 9th by the Appeals Court in Atlanta, in spite of that they are still in prisons, seven years of punishment because they were there to fight terrorism in the US.

And in the US now, there is still a man, a convicted and confessed terrorist, a man who organized, who masterminded the destruction on air of a civilian airplane near Barbados, killing 73 persons on board.  Venezuela is demanding his extradition to continue the trial going on there. So far, the US administration has refused to abide by its obligation if the US is to respect the covenant, international covenants that condemn international terrorism.

We should be together our two peoples, the people living in the US: African-Americans, Native-Americans, Latinos, poor hard-working white Americans and the Cuban people in fighting really against terrorism, exploitation and discrimination.

I am sure that you who made history ten years ago, who are making history now will be crucial in the advent of a better world. Thank you, very much, and let's be sure that what you are doing now is again making history for all of us.

Thank you, very much Courtesy of Working Group Against Terrorism (www.antiterroristas.cu)

Under a bright autumn sky, thousands of African-American men, women and children converged on the nation's capital to mark the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March and demanded action to overcome poverty, injustice, joblessness and the effects of substandard schools in black communities.

Speakers included civil rights leaders, Hispanics, poor people, politicians, clergymen, professors, hip-hop musicians and American Indians. Among them were civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, former presidential candidate Al Sharpton and hip-hop executive Russell Simmons.

The crowd also watched video presentations by Ricardo Alarcón, president of the Cuban National Assembly, and Prime Minister P. J. Patterson of Jamaica.

Message of Ricardo Alarcón to the 10th anniversary of the "Million Man March", Washington D.C., October 15, 2005

Dear Friends. Ten years ago, Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam and you made history: for the first time at every corner of the world, millions of people discovered the true voice and real spirit of the millions of brothers and sisters that we discovered were there in your country.

This year you are celebrating, commemorating the tenth anniversary of the historic march.

Let me join you in that celebration and first of all to congratulate Minister Farrakhan, all organizers and all of you. This year, the US also made history in a very different manner. For many of us, many people around the world, we suddenly discovered that in the country that is supposed to be the richest one, the most powerful one, there is also a lot of misery and suffering, and we were sadden with all of you, when we learned about the terrible consequences that hurricane Katrina infringed over the people in the Gulf area.

Katrina was still punishing New Orleans, when we at the National Assembly of Cuba expressed our deep condolences to the people of the US, and the Cuban government offered to send the necessary help, that we thought was important at that moment: more than 1500 doctors, the majority of them women, with the experience in having dealt before with natural disasters, with their equipments, the proper medicines and so, were ready to go there to help those in need. Unfortunately, we never got an answer. But, that had some positive aspects. Starting for that initiative, we have created what we call the International Brigade that is named after Henry Reeve, a young American who fought and died here in Cuba fighting with us for the independence of Cuba in the 19th Century.

Those doctors are prepared to assist anybody in need in any part of the world, with their experience that they learned in the Caribbean, in Africa, serving in other countries. Hundreds of them are right now helping the people in Guatemala, Central America, victims of the terrible floods that took place recently there, and others may be helping very soon the Pakistanis, that were victims of the terrible earthquake  recently.

I would like to take this opportunity to salute all of you, to convey to you our deepest feelings of brotherhood and sympathy. We are brothers and sisters, we are neighbors who should be working together for a better world.

The very important issue facing our two peoples is to learn the truth, to be able to communicate with each other. At this moment the world is facing a very difficult circumstance: those who pretend to continue perpetuating a system of exploitation and discrimination do not want us to learn the truth: the truth is that people are dying right now, are suffering right now out of a war without justification, based on the excuse of fighting terrorism, and at the same time in your own country there are five brothers of mine, five Cubans who are examples of solidarity and international feelings. They also fought for the African peoples, they fought in Angola against apartheid and they were in the US fighting the terrorist groups that operate from there against my country.

That was expressed openly by the US Government in the indictment that they presented against them, and also in the convictions and the sentences that were imposed upon them. They were acquitted on August 9th by the Appeals Court in Atlanta, in spite of that they are still in prisons, seven years of punishment because they were there to fight terrorism in the US.

And in the US now, there is still a man, a convicted and confessed terrorist, a man who organized, who masterminded the destruction on air of a civilian airplane near Barbados, killing 73 persons on board.  Venezuela is demanding his extradition to continue the trial going on there. So far, the US administration has refused to abide by its obligation if the US is to respect the covenant, international covenants that condemn international terrorism.

We should be together our two peoples, the people living in the US: African-Americans, Native-Americans, Latinos, poor hard-working white Americans and the Cuban people in fighting really against terrorism, exploitation and discrimination.

I am sure that you who made history ten years ago, who are making history now will be crucial in the advent of a better world. Thank you, very much, and let's be sure that what you are doing now is again making history for all of us.

Thank you, very much

 

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